As important as evidence-based psychotherapy is for our addiction treatment program, it can’t be the only activity at Searidge Foundation. We schedule a wide variety of alternative therapies that help reinforce the more clinical drug rehab treatments and keep each day spent with us interesting and rewarding. This program includes Yoga, meditation, mindfulness meditation, acupuncture, Tai Chi, relaxation therapy, creative art therapy and Native healing rituals. These activities help renew the body, the mind, and the soul. And while these practices cannot cure you of a drug addiction, they can empower you with a healthy and entirely individual strength and spirit that will help you cope with life’s daily stresses and anxieties in a helpful constructive manner, rather than self medicating with drugs or alcohol. Drug Rehab Near Me
In keeping with the idea of dual diagnosis, it is clear that a big part of alcohol rehabilitation is improving mental health. Even people not clinically diagnosed with co-occurring disorders suffer mentally under the control of alcohol. This is why depression and anxiety are both warning signs of alcohol abuse. The fact is that alcohol affects how the mind works; it affects the thoughts and emotions. Addiction and Recovery: A How to Guide | Shawn Kingsbury | TEDxUIdaho
The official diagnosis of drug addiction by the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders (2000), which makes distinctions between drug use, abuse, and substance dependence, is flawed. First, diagnosis of drug use versus abuse can be arbitrary and reflect cultural norms, not medical phenomena. Second, the term substance dependence implies that dependence is the primary pharmacologic phenomenon underlying addiction, which is likely not true, as tolerance, sensitization, and learning and memory also play central roles. It is ironic and unfortunate that the Manual avoids use of the term addiction, which provides the best description of the clinical syndrome.

Problem drinking soon progresses to physical dependency. At this stage, you have probably developed a tolerance to alcohol and require more of it to feel the same level of enjoyment as before. This increased consumption can cause your body to get used to alcohol. When you are not using it, or the effects begin to wear off, you will experience physical withdrawal symptoms such as a rapid heartbeat, sweating, tremors, and nausea.

If a program doesn’t include these type of approaches, or claims to use “new” strategies, ask to see an independent evaluation of their program outcomes. An evaluation should measure whether the service has had a positive impact (on drug use, dependence or mental health) and what the completion rates are. It can be conducted by independent specialists, or sometimes by the service itself.
Exposure to other demographic groups in treatment can be an equalizing experience, demonstrating the reality of alcoholism as a universal disease. On the other hand, some patients feel more comfortable and can express themselves more effectively in settings where they can associate with their peers. Patients who are also professionals have unique stressors and needs that can be more effectively addressed in specialized programs.
For example: As a result of heavy traffic, a recovering alcoholic may decide one afternoon to exit the highway and travel on side roads. This will result in the creation of a high-risk situation when he realizes he is inadvertently driving by his old favorite bar. If this individual is able to employ successful coping strategies, such as distracting himself from his cravings by turning on his favorite music, then he will avoid the relapse risk (PATH 1) and heighten his efficacy for future abstinence. If, however, he lacks coping mechanisms—for instance, he may begin ruminating on his cravings (PATH 2)—then his efficacy for abstinence will decrease, his expectations of positive outcomes will increase, and he may experience a lapse—an isolated return to substance intoxication. So doing results in what Marlatt refers to as the Abstinence Violation Effect, characterized by guilt for having gotten intoxicated and low efficacy for future abstinence in similar tempting situations. This is a dangerous pathway, Marlatt proposes, to full-blown relapse.

Substance abuse therapy: Used as a part of many inpatient and outpatient programs, therapy is one of the cornerstones of drug addiction treatment. Individual, group and family therapy help patients and their loved ones understand the nature and causes of addiction. Therapy teaches coping strategies and life skills needed to live a productive, sober life in the community. For individuals with a co-occurring mental illness, intensive psychotherapy can also address psychiatric symptoms and find the underlying issues that contribute to addiction. Inside Shalom House, Australia’s ‘strictest’ drug rehabilitation | Australian Story
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