The National Institute of Mental Health defines depression as a common but serious mood disorder that causes severe symptoms that can affect how you feel, think and handle daily activities. These symptoms must be present for at least two weeks in order for an individual to be diagnosed with depression. In many cases, depression and substance abuse occur simultaneously. Sometimes depression precedes substance abuse, and other times, the reverse is true. In addition to facilities that treat substance use and co-occurring disorders, there are various inpatient facilities for mental health alone. As an inpatient for depression, you can receive individualized care at The Recovery Village. Step 1 of the 12 Steps for Recovery from Addiction | Guided Meditation
Treatment should address more than just your drug abuse. Addiction affects your whole life, including your relationships, career, health, and psychological well-being. Treatment success depends on developing a new way of living and addressing the reasons why you turned to drugs in the first place. For example, your drug dependency may have developed from a desire to manage pain or to cope with stress, in which case you’ll need to find a healthier way to relieve pain or to handle stressful situations.
Inpatient usually offers more services, but it tends to cost more. Outpatient is a less-expensive option that's generally safe and effective for people with mild or moderate alcohol withdrawal. It works best if your physical and mental health is good, your home is stable, you have support at home, and you don’t have a long history of problem drinking.
Physical dependence on a drug can cause serious withdrawal symptoms if a person suddenly stops using the substance or severely reduces the dose. The withdrawal process itself can be uncomfortable and dangerous. Some of the classic signs of withdrawal include tremors, cold sweats, involuntary movements (e.g., jerking, twitching, or shaking), nausea and vomiting, muscle cramps and bone pain. Because withdrawal can be dangerous, proper medical detox can be a life-saving step in recovery. The Twelve Step programme for Beginners

Assessment and evaluation– Treatment typically begins with a complete physical and psychological assessment to establish which method of rehabilitation should be used. This is completed by both physicians and treatment counselors. Medical and mental health records are read. Family and alcohol-use histories are also reviewed. This process helps to chart the best course of action. Oftentimes, follow-up reviews are necessary to update or adjust treatment measures. Every aspect of care is based on a personalized treatment plan.
Numerous studies have proven that Antabuse is effective in the treatment of alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Antabuse has been used since 1951. (The generic name of Antabuse is Disulfiram.) Antabuse is not only effective in treating alcoholism, it is also helpful in treating drug addiction. If you have a drug problem, anything that helps you stop drinking will also help you stop using drugs, because alcohol usually leads to drugs.
Stimulants, such as tobacco, cocaine or prescription amphetamines, stimulate the brain and nervous system, causing increased alertness. Depressants, such as barbiturates and benzodiazepines, slow activity in the brain and nervous system, causing relaxation. Hallucinogens, such as LSD and PCP, drastically disrupt the way the brain and nervous system communicate, causing hallucinations. Rehab: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
×