It can be heartbreaking to realize that your loved one has a problem with alcohol. You want to do anything you can to help — but you’re afraid that if you speak up, you could destroy your relationship, or even drive your loved one deeper into addiction. At first, it’s much easier to deny the problem. But as time goes on and personal, financial, or legal problems increase, you’ll have to face the possibility that your loved one could have a substance use disorder. Learning to recognize the red flags of alcoholism could not only save your relationship, it could help you avoid a tragedy.
How pro-active is the Treatment Center’s approach toward preventing relapse?  Does the Treatment Center place greater priority on profit or on getting people free from addiction?  What precedence does the Treatment Center set on educating residents about drug and alcohol abuse?  What is the philosophy or view of the Treatment Center on healing drug and alcohol addiction?  Is healing drug and alcohol addiction perceived as a process that is forged through developing a stronger spiritual relationship with God?  Is God acknowledged as part of the healing process at the Treatment Center?  Are residents in the Treatment Center embraced as a community and nurtured by those that have completed the process?
Outpatient treatment is the next step down in a continuum of care. It is also a rehabilitation option for individuals whose addiction is less severe and doesn’t require inpatient treatment. Clients in this phase of rehab drug treatment visit the facility regularly, but do not stay overnight. This approach allows the individual to receive drug treatment while maintaining family and job responsibilities.
The specific details and content of aftercare will vary from one facility to the next, but typically it comprises a participation in various therapy sessions on site, alongside phone sessions if and when required. The rehab will give you a bespoke recovery plan to take with you once you leave the facility which will include these aftercare sessions as well as recommendations for attendance at fellowship groups.

Ask for friends and family to support you in the recovery process; chances are, they’ll be proud of you for taking control of your life again. External support groups include Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), which originated the 12-step program and now has approximately 2 million members. The 12 steps emphasize the participant’s ability to submit to a “higher power” to ask for help. The higher power doesn’t have to be rooted in religion, though that is the case for many. Others look for a “higher power” within.


You can support your drug treatment and protect yourself from relapse by having activities and interests that provide meaning to your life. It’s important to be involved in things that you enjoy, that make you feel needed, and add meaning to your life. When your life is filled with rewarding activities and a sense of purpose, your addiction will lose its appeal.
How the drug is taken. Smoking a drug or injecting it into a vein increases its addictive potential.33,34 Both smoked and injected drugs enter the brain within seconds, producing a powerful rush of pleasure. However, this intense high can fade within a few minutes. Scientists believe this starkly felt contrast drives some people to repeated drug taking in an attempt to recapture the fleeting pleasurable state.
Depressants, also known as CNS depressants, slow down brain activity to put the body in a state of extreme relaxation. Misuse occurs when people take high doses to achieve euphoria or use the drugs with alcohol or other drugs to enhance their effects. Sexual predators also use depressants such as GHB and Rohypnol to take advantage of their victims.
Drug abuse statistics can be alarming, but the numbers also show a potential for help and healing. The Substance Abuse and MEntal Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) National Survey on Substance Abuse and Health states that while 21 million Americans aged 12 and over needed drug or alcohol treatment in 2016, only 3.8 million received the help they needed at a specialized treatment facility. Other research sources on drug addiction show that:

Drug abuse can apply to a wide variety of substances, from prescription medication to illicit street drugs. The term is often used to discuss the improper use of substances, especially substances that can be used for medical purposes. Drug abuse is not limited to those with a history of addiction, as many people develop a substance use disorder after taking prescription medications like opioids, benzodiazepines and more. Regular drug abuse can lead to serious patterns of behavior that result in a substance use disorder or addiction.


Ongoing support and aftercare are essential to this type of sustained, long-term recovery. Many drug abuse rehab centers feature robust aftercare programs, including ongoing individual therapy sessions on a periodic basis, group therapy meetings, and alumni events. Oftentimes, alumni are also encouraged to get involved in their own recovery community by participating in 12-step meetings or residing in a sober living home. If recovering addicts have people they can turn to for support when they are tempted to relapse, they are more likely to stand strong and resist the urge to use again.
Group, individual, and can help to address the root causes of addiction and build communication and life skills that are necessary to live a sober life. Group therapy and family therapy provide a means to talk openly and honestly about your addiction and gain support from other in recovery, parents, siblings and adult children. One-on-one talk therapy provides the opportunity to more deeply explore underlying issues and trauma in a private setting.
Once used as a diagnostic label, substance abuse typically refers to behavioral patterns of drug use that involve impairment and physical and mental distress. Some people may use the term “drug abuse” to reference a marked physical and mental dependence on drugs. Today, drug abuse typically refers to misusing substances, not necessarily being addicted to them. However, drug abuse can often lead to a physical dependence or addiction associated with a focus on obtaining and using drugs and severe withdrawal symptoms.
Use any setbacks in recovery as a learning experience and recognise that while you may have made a mistake, you do not have to make it worse by continuing to drink. Get yourself to your nearest fellowship meeting or call your sponsor as soon as possible. You will then need to take a good look at what led to your setback. It is important that you take the time to do this so that you can avoid another occurrence in the future.
The best way to tell your loved ones that you’re addicted is to be as honest and as open as possible. Be prepared for the possibility that they won’t understand your disease — even today, many people don’t realize that addiction is a chronic condition on the same level as diabetes, cancer, or hypertension. Your loved ones may criticize you; they may even try to persuade you that you don’t have a problem. It’s important to stand firm in your new self-awareness and stay on track with your plan for treatment.

Drug addiction is a chronic brain disease that causes powerful physical and psychological cravings for mind-altering substances, including illegal intoxicants like cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, and PCP. Many people also become addicted to misused prescription drugs, or to chemical substances not manufactured for human consumption (inhalants), to party drugs (ecstasy), hallucinogens like LSD, or to marijuana, which despite its benign reputation is the most widely abused illicit drug.
According to the results of a survey published in the Archives of General Psychiatry, approximately 2.6 percent of American adults meet the criteria for drug dependence and drug addiction. Globally, the figure is similar; the World Health Organization estimates that nearly 3 percent of adults around the world suffer from a drug use disorder. At first glance, these numbers may seem small. However, these statistics do not reflect the number of people who have tried illicit drugs, or who have abused illicit substances or prescription medications. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that almost 10 percent of American adults have tried illicit drugs. Anyone who uses drugs recreationally or experimentally is at risk of developing dependence and drug addiction. Clearbrook Manor - Drug and Alcohol Treatment Center

Support groups provide people with understanding peers and ongoing support, in church basements, community centers, and public facilities scattered all across the country. Here, people can come together to discuss addiction’s difficulties, and they can meet with other addicted people to gain support and insight. Alumni groups are similar, in that they link peers together to discuss addiction, but these groups contain people who all worked within the same facility for help. Overcoming Addiction ► How To Prevent Relapse
This quote might best sum up the topic of proclivity for acquiring a drug addiction: “Most people who become addicts are subject to a combination of risk factors.” Anything from childhood trauma and having alcoholic parents to being exposed to drugs at an early age can influence whether a person takes their first hit or their first drink. And whether addiction will develop.5
According to The National Institute on Drug Abuse, of the estimated 22.5 million Americans classified as having a drug abuse or addiction problem, only about 4 million will receive the care they need to heal.1 If you or someone you care about struggles with drug dependence, don’t wait any longer to get help. Instead, contact us at Michael’s House today. We can discuss your options in rehabilitation and help you to choose the program that will be most effective for you. Call now.
Hallucinogens are mind-altering, psychoactive substances with a high potential for abuse. These substances are often taken by people looking to distort their perception of reality. Hallucinogens are also sometimes used to self-medicate a mental disorder, such as depression. However, taking hallucinogens for self-medication purposes can make an underlying condition even worse.
The National Institute of Mental Health defines depression as a common but serious mood disorder that causes severe symptoms that can affect how you feel, think and handle daily activities. These symptoms must be present for at least two weeks in order for an individual to be diagnosed with depression. In many cases, depression and substance abuse occur simultaneously. Sometimes depression precedes substance abuse, and other times, the reverse is true. In addition to facilities that treat substance use and co-occurring disorders, there are various inpatient facilities for mental health alone. As an inpatient for depression, you can receive individualized care at The Recovery Village.
Most severe alcohol withdrawal symptoms occur in the first three to four days after stopping drinking. Detoxification involves taking a short course of medication to help reduce or prevent withdrawal symptoms. Medications such as Valium (diazepam), Librium (chlordiazepoxide), or Ativan (lorazepam), members of the benzodiazepine family, are usually used for detox. Beating Opioid Addiction | Joy's Story
The methamphetamine binge is followed by a phase called “tweaking,” a state characterized by restlessness, anxiety, paranoia, agitation, sleeplessness, and intense cravings. “Tweakers” may experience delusional thinking, psychotic episodes, hallucinations, and violent impulses. Severe itching and the urge to harm oneself are common at this point. Methamphetamine withdrawal is complicated by the fact that many heavy users are malnourished, dehydrated, and sleep deprived. Meth-induced psychosis can continue for weeks or months after the addict stops using. In a case study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, one methamphetamine addict continued to have auditory hallucinations, fears of persecution, and paranoid delusions for a year after treatment. A rehab jail for heroin addicts
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