In many cases, symptoms of the mental health disorder appear first. As they become more and more overwhelming, the patient may attempt to “treat” those symptoms by using different drugs. For example, a patient who struggles with depression may attempt to improve their mood by taking heroin or prescription drugs. Patients who are living with anxiety may try to calm themselves by smoking marijuana. Conversely, someone dealing with an eating disorder may attempt to further their weight loss attempts by abusing stimulant drugs like cocaine or crystal meth.
Maintaining a small centre permits our clinical and support staff get to know each and every resident. This allows us to create highly individualised treatment plans for our residents. Our group therapy sessions are small and all-inclusive, which we strongly believe is much more effective and less overwhelming than larger institutional sessions involving a speaker and an audience.
Detox is the first step in helping your brain and body heal from substance abuse. The detox process begins with evaluations by medical doctors and nurses to determine which, if any, medical interventions are needed. Detox is primarily a time to flush the chemicals from your body, which can be an uncomfortable experience without the right medical care to help ease discomfort and/or drug cravings. Hazelden Betty Ford medical staff will work with you to evaluate your level of discomfort and provide you with medications, if needed, to address any discomfort or cravings.
Whether you’re seeking rehab for drug addiction alone or in conjunction with depression or any other mental disorder, you can find it with one of The Recovery Village’s locations. Although intake coordinators will ask you a list of questions when you call, keep in mind that you have the liberty to ask questions of your own to be sure you’re choosing the best facility to meet your needs. Knowing what to ask in advance and documenting the answers can help you be more prepared to make a confident decision about addiction recovery treatment.
Traditional alcohol treatment programs rely on evidence-based strategies such as psychotherapy, behavioral modification therapy, peer group counseling, nutritional counseling and 12-step programs. Rehabilitation begins with detox, a cleansing process that allows the patient to withdraw safely and comfortably from alcohol. After detox, the patient participates in a structured series of therapies that are designed to help him or her modify destructive behaviors and create a sober life.
The patient's response determines the physician's next step. If the patient denies the problem, recommending joining AA will not work. Involving the family and/or suggesting a trial of abstinence is useful, and, importantly, the physician should follow up with the patient in a few weeks. The patient might be angry initially and storm out of the office, but then the patient might recall the physician's warning months or years later and stop drinking. For patients who recognize a problem and will consider referral, the cheapest (free) and most accessible option is AA.
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Substance abuse therapy: Used as a part of many inpatient and outpatient programs, therapy is one of the cornerstones of drug addiction treatment. Individual, group and family therapy help patients and their loved ones understand the nature and causes of addiction. Therapy teaches coping strategies and life skills needed to live a productive, sober life in the community. For individuals with a co-occurring mental illness, intensive psychotherapy can also address psychiatric symptoms and find the underlying issues that contribute to addiction. Inside Shalom House, Australia’s ‘strictest’ drug rehabilitation | Australian Story
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