All calls to numbers on individual facility listings will always go to the facility listed. All calls to general contact numbers and contact us forms on this site are routed to Delphi Behavioral Health Group. If Delphi Behavioral Health Group is unable to assist with a particular need they are committed to providing direction and assistance in finding appropriate care.
GENERAL DISCLAIMER: Rehabs.com is designed for educational purposes only and is not engaged in rendering medical advice. The information provided through Rehabs.com should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a health problem, you should consult your health care provider. The authors, editors, producers, and contributors shall have no liability, obligation, or responsibility to any person or entity for any loss, damage, or adverse consequences alleged to have happened directly or indirectly as a consequence of material on this website. If you believe you have a medical emergency, you should immediately call 911. Everything You Wanted to Know about Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder: A Primer for Non-Clinicians

Addiction comes in many forms and is largely found to involve more than one substance or condition. One of the more common coexisting substance combinations is alcohol and drug addiction. According to The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, more than 23 million people over the age of 12 are faced with an addiction to both alcohol and drugs. Many substance abuse treatment centers address both substances. The individualized programs at The Recovery Village focus on treating addiction to drugs, alcohol, or both, in addition to co-occurring mental disorders.


There is a wide range of alcohol rehab programs, including inpatient, outpatient, day-patient, and evening programs. Inpatient rehab facilities are the most structured. Generally, these programs run for 30, 60, or 90 days. There is a benefit to stepping out of your environment so that you can completely focus on recovery without any distractions, as in an inpatient program. However, that is not an option for many people. 5 Benefits of Alcohol Rehabilitation
Remember though, overcoming alcoholism is a process. Less than half of individuals relapse after achieving one year of sobriety. That number reduces to less than 15 percent who relapse after five years of sobriety. For the greatest chance of long-term sobriety after completing an inpatient or outpatient program, you should participate in local support groups and continue with counseling. Treating alcoholism is an investment in your future. It will not only make a huge difference in your life, but also the lives of those around you such as family members and friends. Best drug rehab centers in ny - Addiction treatment and recovery New York
One of countless treatment centers in California, Sober Living by the Sea is actually one of the best in the state. They have over 25 years of experience and take a clinical approach to treatment. Part of their approach is uncovering any subsidiary mental disorders that may be associated with an addiction. Sober Living by the Sea also combines therapy with an array of activities such as hiking and swimming.
Note: These PET scans compare the brain of an individual with a history of cocaine use disorder (middle and right) to the brain of an individual without a history of cocaine use (left). The person who has had a cocaine use disorder has lower levels of the D2 dopamine receptor (depicted in red) in the striatum one month (middle) and four months (right) after stopping cocaine use compared to the non-user. The level of dopamine receptors in the brain of the cocaine user are higher at the 4-month mark (right), but have not returned to the levels observed in the non-user (left).

Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
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