In many cases, symptoms of the mental health disorder appear first. As they become more and more overwhelming, the patient may attempt to “treat” those symptoms by using different drugs. For example, a patient who struggles with depression may attempt to improve their mood by taking heroin or prescription drugs. Patients who are living with anxiety may try to calm themselves by smoking marijuana. Conversely, someone dealing with an eating disorder may attempt to further their weight loss attempts by abusing stimulant drugs like cocaine or crystal meth.

Changes in the brain that support physical and psychological dependency on mind-altering substances are the direct cause of addiction, but those changes do not occur at random. Addiction experts believe drug addiction emerges from an interplay of genetic and environmental factors, although one factor or the other may be strong enough to make a person vulnerable to addiction in some instances. Overcome Any Addiction: Dopamine Receptor Repair & Addiction Healing (sound therapy)
In 2016, Recovery Brands conducted a survey asking patients leaving a recovery treatment program what clinic characteristics they saw as high priority aspects to examine when looking at a program. The top priority was the clinic's financial practices, such as insurance accepted, payment options, and financial support. They also valued facility offerings (amenities, comforts, quality of housing, etc.) much more after graduating from treatment. Individuals looking for treatment will want to look at a facility's financial policies as well as the program's offerings to aid in their final program choice. Read More
Theresa Soltesz graduated with her Bachelor’s Degree in Addiction Science and Addiction Counseling from Minnesota State University in 2010. Upon completion of her degree and clinical internship, Theresa began her career as an Addiction Counselor in 2010. Theresa is currently certified as a Certified Addiction Professional (CAP) by The Florida Certification Board, a Certified International Alcohol and Drug Counselor (ICADC) by The International Certification and Reciprocity Consortium (IC&RC) since 2013. Theresa is also a Certified Professional Life Coach and is currently awaiting an additional certification as a Certified Behavioral Health Case Manager (CBHCM) by The Florida Certification Board.Theresa has worked as a Primary Addiction Counselor in various treatment centers for addiction and co-occurring disorders in Florida, Minnesota, and Colorado in various settings, including detox, residential, PHP, IOP and OP. Eager to learn, She has also worked as an Addiction Counselor for various populations, such as adolescent and adult males and females, diverse ethnic populations, homeless individuals, individuals suffering from severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI), and the LGBTQ community. As a proud recovering addict herself, Theresa understands first-hand the struggles of addiction.
However, other elements – for example the type of therapies available – may lie completely beyond your understanding and experience. With this in mind, it is always advisable to speak with an addiction specialist who will almost certainly be able to think of things which may not occur to you but which could be very important. By leveraging the vast experience of an addiction specialist you can be sure that issues of great importance will not go unaddressed.
Made from a mixture of baking soda and powder cocaine, crack is a version of cocaine—but at a lower purity level. The key difference is that crack is smoked. This method of ingestion allows the drug to seep into lung tissues, producing a completely different result. Smoking crack causes the high to be much faster and more intense than the high traditionally felt from powder cocaine. Crack’s high is extremely short, usually less than 15 minutes, causing the user to crave a frightening amount of the drug. Withdrawal symptoms can cause immense depression, agitation and insomnia – all of which drive an addict to keep using the drug.11

Binge drinking has become the most widespread form of alcohol abuse in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Over 30 million adults in the U.S. (approximately 15 percent) admit to binge drinking within the past month. Most of these drinkers are white males between the ages of 18 and 34. Forty percent of college students report episodes of binge drinking.
Seek advice and support from others. Counselors, therapists, and support groups can be valuable sources of advice when you’re trying to deal with an addicted loved one. A substance abuse therapist can give you pointers on how to communicate effectively with someone who’s in denial. Twelve-step groups like Al-Anon or Nar-Anon can offer support and coping strategies, as well.
Support groups are most useful as a long-term drug rehab program in that they can help hold former addicts accountable years after their treatment is complete. Patients find themselves surrounded by like-minded individuals who are in similar situations like the ones with which the patient is struggling. Many find it easier to discuss issues like temptation and family problems with others who understand.
One study performed in Norway demonstrated that brief advice given early can affect gamma glutamyl transferase levels and reported alcohol consumption. Early warning makes a difference to persons who drink heavily. In a study of 200 workers with alcoholism, recalling a physician's warning about drinking at the beginning of the study was associated with a better prognosis 2 years later. Unfortunately, less than 25% had received warnings from their physicians, again illustrating the problem of missed diagnosis.

Because an alcohol use disorder can be a chronic relapsing disease, persistence is key. It is rare that someone would go to treatment once and then never drink again. More often, people must repeatedly try to quit or cut back, experience recurrences, learn from them, and then keep trying. For many, continued followup with a treatment provider is critical to overcoming problem drinking.
Addiction is an all-consuming disease, using much of an individual’s time, energy and resources. There are many physical, mental and emotional signs of addiction. If you or a loved one are experiencing a combination of these signs, treatment may be a stepping stone for long-term recovery. Looking for signs and symptoms of drug abuse can be the first step toward identifying an addiction: Inside NHS detox centre - Victoria Derbyshire
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